Trombone Playing Lessons : How to Play Octaves on the Trombone

Learn how to play octaves on the trombone.

Learn how to play octaves on atrombone in this free video music lesson. Expert: JD Keating Bio: JD Keating is a musician, artist and educator from Western Massachusetts. For two decades he has lent his varied talents to innumerable projects in the music industry. Filmmaker: Christian Munoz-Donoso

4 Learning & Playing Tuba/Trumpet/Euphonium/Baritone/Flugelhorn/French Horn/Cornet

In this video, Brett Youens describes the logic behind the system of overtones on valved brass instruments, with the tuba used as an example. www.geocities.com (Transcript) Hi. Let’s talk a little more about valved brass instruments and how they work. As you know by now this is a tuba, but could just as well be a trumpet, or a euphonium, or a French horn, or a flugelhorn. They all work on the same principles. The principle we want to talk about today is “overtones”. Overtones are all the notes that you can produce on your instrument without the usage of the valves. So let’s say you play a trumpet in C. What does that mean? That means, the lowest note you can produce on your instrument — without valves — is a C. That’s called the fundamental. But you can, of course, produce many other notes above that, and those are called overtones. So we have a fundamental and many, many overtones. Let’s say you play Euphonium in Bb. That means the fundamental is a Bb — that’s the lowest note you can play without the usage of the valves — and then you have many other overtones above that. One thing to know about the overtones — and we won’t get into the mathematics today — but one thing to know about the overtones is that they get closer and closer to each other as we go higher and higher up. So if the lowest note is here, and the next note is here, then the next note after that might be here, and the next one would be, maybe, here, the next one here, and the next one here, and at

3 Learning & Playing Tuba/Trumpet/Euphonium/Baritone/Flugelhorn/French Horn/Cornet

In this video, Brett Youens describes the specific intervals produced by depressing the valves on brass instruments, with the tuba used as an example. www.geocities.com (Transcript) Hi. Let’s talk a little more about valved brass instruments and how they work. As you know, this is a tuba, but could just as well be a trumpet, or a euphonium, or a french horn, or a flugelhorn. They all work on the same principles. We’ve talked before about how the depression of one or more of the valves lowers the pitch; today we will talk specifically about by how much you can lower that pitch. So let’s take a look at a piano keyboard. The distance between these two notes is known as a whole step, or a whole tone. And the distance between these two notes is called a half step, or a half tone. Now what’s the difference? This is the whole tone; you see that there’s an extra key between them. And here’s the half tone; there’s no extra key between them. That’s the difference. So this is a whole tone and this is a whole tone; but this is a half tone. This would also be a half tone; this would also be a half tone. Another example of a whole step would be here because you see there is a note between them. So here’s a question for you: What’s the distance between those two notes? Well, the answer is: one, two, three. That distance, or that interval is three whole tones, and there is a name for that in western music: It’s called a “three-tone”. But, of course, no one would say “three-tone”, you

Trombone Playing Lessons : How to Play B Flat Scales on the Trombone

Learn how to play B flat scales on thetrombone in this free video music lesson. Expert: JD Keating Bio: JD Keating is a musician, artist and educator from Western Massachusetts. For two decades he has lent his varied talents to innumerable projects in the music industry. Filmmaker: Christian Munoz-Donoso

2 Learning & Playing Tuba/Trumpet/Euphonium/Baritone/Flugelhorn/French Horn/Cornet

In this video, Brett Youens describes the logic behind the system of valves on brass instruments, with the tuba used as an example. www.geocities.com (Transcript) Hi. Let’s look a little more at brass instruments with valves and how they work. This is a tuba, but as we know, it could just as well be a trumpet, or a euphonium, or a French horn, or a flugelhorn; they all work on the same principles. Let’s look today at the logic behind the system of fingerings. If you think about it, there are only two possible states for a valve: either depressed or not. A lot like a human, I guess. So if each of the three valves has two different possibilities – and we have two times two times two – which gives us eight possibilities. The highest note we could play is by not depressing any valve. And a little lower is pressing the baby; a little lower is pressing the daddy, and a little lower is pressing the granddaddy. Now, let’s think about this from the bottom up: If we press everything, then we get the lowest note we could. And a little higher, subtracting the baby, subtracting the daddy, subtracting the granddaddy. So this is just a mirror image of itself. And these two notes, of course, produce – again, aside from tuning issues that don’t concern us here – the same note. Now, think about the following: Every single note that a tuba or a trumpet or a flugelhorn or a French horn or a euphonium ever plays, they play it with one of these eight possibilities. So there’s not much in the

1 Learning & Playing Tuba/Trumpet/Euphonium/Baritone/Flugelhorn/French Horn/Cornet

In this video, Brett Youens describes the two principles on which all valved brass instruments work, with the tuba used as an example. www.geocities.com (Transcript) Hi. Let’s look at brass instruments with valves and how they work. I have a tuba here; it could just as easily be a trumpet, or a French horn, or a flugelhorn, or a euphonium; they all work on the same principle. If I blow into the mouthpiece, then the air travels this path here, and comes out of the bell. Now, if we think about a trumpet, we’ll notice the first principle of the two principles we’ll need to know about how brass instruments work. A trumpet has a very short pathway for the air to flow through, and a tuba has a very long pathway. Trumpets produce very high notes, and tubas produce very low notes. So: The longer the pathway, the lower the note. The longer, the lower. So, if I want to produce a different note, then I’ll need to lengthen my tuba. But, of course, I don’t have time while I’m playing to get out a hammer and a nail and maybe some sort of smelting machine and lengthen my tuba. That’s what the valves are for. By depressing a valve, you make sure that the air takes a detour, thereby lengthening the tuba. So if I press this first valve here, you’ll see that the air takes an extra path. If I press the second — this little baby valve here — then it takes a detour of a shorter length. And if I press the third valve, then it’s this long, winding, granddaddy-of-them-all valve, right? So you

Trombone Playing Lessons : Slide Positions for Playing the Trombone

Learn slide positions for playing thetrombone in this free video music lesson. Expert: JD Keating Bio: JD Keating is a musician, artist and educator from Western Massachusetts. For two decades he has lent his varied talents to innumerable projects in the music industry. Filmmaker: Christian Munoz-Donoso

How to play the trumpet

Learn How to play the trumpet within 30 days! www.play-the-trumpet.com Video preview of the Video course demonstrating the basics of professional Trumpet playing. Purchase your copy of Video and book at http With the full 40 minute video (6 lessons) any trumpet beginner can learn how to play, and any trumpet player can improve playing: Sound, technique, playing high notes, playing softly and trumpet maintenance. Demonstration by Danny Carney 43 years on the trumpet. Purchase your copy of Video and book at www.play-the-trumpet.com

Trombone Playing Lessons : How to Play C Major Scales on the Trombone

Learn how to play C major scales on thetrombone in this free video music lesson. Expert: JD Keating Bio: JD Keating is a musician, artist and educator from Western Massachusetts. For two decades he has lent his varied talents to innumerable projects in the music industry. Filmmaker: Christian Munoz-Donoso